The Mystery of Maeshowe

Maeshowe is another one of the Neolithic wonders on Orkney. A vast chambered tomb it stands on an ancient trackway that connects it to the stunningly well-preserved village of Skara Brae, as well as passing near the Standing Stones of Stenness and the Ring of Brodgar.

Various calculations by archaeologists estimate it needed up to 100,000 man-hours to build and complete. Maeshowe is generally described as a tomb, but if so, why does it have a door that can only be closed from the inside? A pivoting stone door blocks off the entrance, but can only be closed from the inside?

Once more the poem The Seer provides a (mythical) answer.

Inkwork (4)
Maeshowe appears as a grassy mound rising from a flat plain near the southeast end of the Loch of Harray. On the Winter Solstice, the sun rises between the Hills of Hoy to shine directly down the passageway.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Where did summer go?

I frequently walk some extensive wetlands that are home to hundreds of birds, many migratory.  And already one can sense the gathering energy as the migratory birds begin to prepare for their flight south.  Large groups of geese move slowly back and fore across the lakes, Lapwings flock and fly at apparently the slightest reason. The nights are beginning to draw in, the night temperature falling, and Autumn is drawing nigh.

But so soon!